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for real energy independence? we can see it today on the horizon. progress on pipeline approval. progress on fracking regulation, that means more american oil and more natural gas. build the pipeline and here come the jobs at no anything to the taxpayers. environmentalists hate it, but maybe, just maybe the americans will win this one. >> and we're close to a market high and "varney & company" is about to begin. n't know it ye, but they' gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> good morning, everyone. we've been talking about apple losing its school for quite a while now and last night we got some proof. less money coming in than expected. the stock, way and i me
're assessment of this. >> obama: the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. we can't cede to other nations the technology that willpower new jobs and new industry, we must claim it's promise. that's how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national treasure. a forest and waterways our crop lands and snow capped peaks. >> cenk: so michael, first off were you encouraged by these portions of the speech? >> yes, i was encouraged. i was inspired. i thought it was a great speech. you know, i thought what the president did really well was he talked about fighting climate disruption both as moral obligation, but he also pointed out that transitioning to clean energy is a great economic opportunity. it's not just an obligation that we have for future generations. it's an opportunity that we have right now to move beyond dirty fuel. i thought the president did a great job. >> cenk: all right michael, we know that it wasn't just words in this case, because "the new york times" with a story
and more powerful storms. the path toward sustainable energy sources will belong and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must leave it. we cannot cede this, must climates prague -- its promise. that is how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national parks, forests, waterways, snowcapped peaks. that is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care. that is what will lend meaning to the creek our fathers once declared. >> there was a lot of time spent on climate change. was that a surprise? guest: i think people expected climate change to get a shout out along with immigration, gun control the environment of trinity was really been very surprised challenge mentioning god. it got a huge and a huge chunk of time, almost more than any other policy issues. that was a real surprise. host: it was an issue we did not hear a lot about on the campaign .rail paria guest: that was by design. his advisers have made it clear that they did not see that as winning -- as a winning campaign issue. although it is something the president did care about, it
of the denying quorum and in the case of speaking as long as you cou could, you had to spend time and energy, you had to organize and it was visible before this body. it was visible before the reporters gathered in the balcony. therefore, the american people, long before there was a television camera here, could see what you were doing and the public could provide feedback on that. but now we come to the modern era. from 1970 forward. in which it became popular to start using the objection as an instrument of party warfare, the objection to a final vote. you know, if we turn back before 1970, you had an overlap of the parties of perhaps 30 members. and so if one had used his objection, they'd have a good sense that you would be able to get cloture. furthermore, there was a social contract that you only interrupted the workings of this body on an issue of deep principle. you only blockaded the operations of the senate on an issue of profound concern to your state. not as a routine instrument of party politics. but that's changed over the last 45 years, since 1970 forward, the last 43 years, in whi
? with 5-hour energy. i get hours of energy now -- no crash later. wait to see the next five hours. >> mike: kobe bryant with another 14-assist game, back to back. still with a big bucket down the stretch, in the final minute, bryant now 8 of 12 from the field. 21 points to go with 14 assists. and the lakers right now with a nine-point cushion with a half minute to go. durant, drivers. ball deflected. touched the baseline. thunder will in-bound once again. durant with 35 points on a night where he's shooting his normal percentage. right now his team looks like they'll come up short. durant inside. picked up by world peace. and the laker fans starting to celebrate. what a start, and a standing ovation here at the staples center. a superb performance from kobe bryant, second straight game, 14 assists. the final score, the lakers 105, and the thunder, 96. for jeff van gundy, lisa salters, the producer, the director and our outstanding abc crew, mike breen saying come out again. yo abc news coming up. fan for the ceiling. you're gonna cool off that hoooounddd! tonight you gotta get your cash ba
do you disagree with? >> dana: energy job, climate change. >> eric: climate change. entitlement have to be on the table. immigration. that will be a big one. you and i have different ideas on how we handle that. >> bob: you are going to take your party in the toilet. >> dana: we have one more block on this. we will get to martin luther king junior and climate change. more ahead. great moments including performance by kelly clarkson and beyonce and inauguration trivia. look over eric's shoulder for that. how much do you know about the historic day? we have a quiz and hope you will play along with us at home. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing e all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. ♪ ♪ >> kimberly: wow! that was kelly clarkson singing earlier in afternoon. welcome back to "the five" and the coverage of today's inauguration. we get thoughts on this. first, let's play for mr. bob beckel one of his favorite moments in honor of martin luther king junior and the holiday we're celebrating. listen
change. >> the solution to climate change is energy policy. the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides, i will be a passionate advocate about this but not based on ideology but based on facts based on science. i hope to sit with all of you and convince you this 6 trillion-dollar market is worth millions of american jobs. >> jennifer: from a political point of view this is a tough issue, the keystone pipeline, and especially with respect to environmental activists. obvious liquory is a big advocate for stopping climate change. what do you think he'll do about keystone? >> i remember he--climate change the copenhagen conference in 2009 senator kerry preceded hillary clinton there, and she proceeded barack obama as one of the areas where he has done significant work on behalf of the administration in this first four years and we'll continue on those interests going forward. it's an interesting thing jennifer in global diplomacy economics is becoming a far more meaningful element of global diplomacy. there is now an assistant secretary of state that focuses on energ
right now. [captioning made possible by constellation energy group] >> welcome to 11 news sunday morning. i'm lisa. >> and i'm kai reed. our top stories in a moment. first a check on our weather with tony pann. >> if we just didn't go through that stretch of weather with the arctic arabs you wouldn't say gosh, it's cold. but in the 20's. compared to the mid teens, it's better. current conditions, 26 at the errant. a little bit of cloud cover hanging around. but we don't expect any precipitation this morning. a mixture of sun and clouds but dry and the high temperature maybe getting above freezing at 33. a nice seven-day forecast when i come back in a few minutes. >> super bowl xliii is now a week from today where our ravens will take on the 49ers and as you can see baltimore ravens fever isn't about to break anytime soon. >> 11 news reporter sarah sampson has more on the frenzy. >> still flying high after last weekend's victory, ravens fans have been flocking to the sports store. >> they want a.f.c. championship pennants and stuff like that and have a shirt and hopefully a victory on su
at limited resources. climate change is a big issue you have been concerned on. the global energy needs are going to increase about 50%, that emissions are going to go up significantly primarily because of china and india and we could do significant harm to the u.s. economy i think by putting additional rules and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this.
: the drought situation, its impact on food prices and energy prices. our two guests will be here and our phone lines are divided regionally. let's go back to some of the numbers. production decreases and apples, asparagus, coffee, increases in peanuts, dry beans, barley, oats, wheat, and potatoes. guest: when you look at the crops that had significant decreases first, we had a mild winter, a late freeze behind that. that hurts the past zero crop, and asparagus, we have seen a continual decline in acreage. 9.7% decrease is acreage-base. poor pollination in washington state. grapefruit production is down 7.4%. we had high dropout rate-- high drought rates in florida. " weather affected strawberry production, primarily in california. host: chuck abbott, how does this compare to previous years? guest: on the major field crops, there was a major impact. wheat farmers were lucky in that their major variety is winter wheat. they were able to harvest the crop before the drought hit. because they were encouraged to grow more wheat, they escaped the brunt of the drought. corn production was down signifi
of the energy market, gasoline futures are spiking as there is word that one of the major east coast refineries. natural gas prices down 4% in today's trading session. guys, we are nearing $100 a barrel, as far as oil prices are concerned. melissa: sandra smith, thank you so much. lori: three-week since boeing 787 had its latest incident. investigator is shifting our focus. we have the latest details just ahead. melissa: the s&p holding their five year high. ♪ the local melissa: it is time to make money with charles payne. charles: i accidentally went to ugg store. we just dumped into the door. what? i could not believe that you know, you do not like to do things on this anecdotal thing. the last time i went to a retail store that crowded with that type of enthusiasm and electricity was back in 2002. steve madden. the place was buzzing. i cracked a few jokes. no one even knew what i was talking about. the stock was five dollars then. you look at all the things that hurt them. weather. sheepskin prices. the macroeconomic situation in europe. i just love the way the stock has been acting. to se
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> license plate extra hp. >> extra hp. by the early '90s, jimmy keene was on top of the world. his booming business afforded him a lavish lifestyle with large homes, souped-up corvettes and an endless supply of women. >> i would have 30 or 40 keg parties with volleyball nets, live bands. we'd have literally a thousand people or more sometimes. these were gigantic, huge parties. >> you were the guy women wanted to be with and guys wanted to be best friends with. >> something like that. >> back then, he owned this 6,000 square foot home. >> right behind that is a golf course. he says he didn't stash the drugs here. >> this is a walk-in closet. >> but there was always a place to hide his fortunes. >> this was a hidden trap door that you could open and when you open it, you have another hidden closet back in here. you can
long-term economic vitality by ensuring we make investments in new energy technology and that we develop new storms of energy as well as -- forms of energy as well as traditional forms of energy here at home so we are less dependent on foreign imports of energy. that's a strategy that enhances our national security, improves the environment, addresses climate change and the very important -- and very importantly helps our economy by allowing industries to develop here in the united states, that this if they don't develop here will develop elsewhere. industries that provide good jobs and will be very sustainable in the future. >> those who look at this issue say dealing with existing power plants would be the best way, most effective way to reduce carbon emissions and advance what the president said in the inaugural. does he agree with that? >> i'm not going to talk about -- >> philosophically. >> philosophically is aned a verb that is somewhat synonymous with speck latively and i will, you know, not speculate on future -- >> [inaudible] inaugural address and those who look at thi
developments in the energy industry could lead to high-paying jobs if the government could get out of the way. >>gretchen: varney, a disclaimer here. sorry he put your daughter into that story. secondly, you can always tell when brian has not slept a lot because he actually has more energy. if we do a study on energy -- >>brian: if i would be powered, it would be by natural gas and that could be the future of our country. >> there's a segue. first of all, let's deal with the pipeline. 53 senators including 9 democrats write a letter to the president saying we want that keystone pipeline. please approve it, mr. president. second item, chesapeake energy, huge natural gas producer, opens up a well, one of these fracking wells. opens it up totally to the e.p.a. come on in. have a look at what we're doing and have a look at the aftermath of what we're doing. and if you can find any kind of pollution, okay, we'll hear about it. those are two huge steps forward toward producing a lot more oil, a lot more natural gas, energy independence, jobs in america, a huge step forward in the government gets ou
a lawsuit for more than $2.5 billion. number three, five hour energy, living essentials promises you have energy with no crash, but a survey shows a quarter of users experience extreme crash. the product may also kill you, at least the fda is investigating. sketchers shapeups. remember that? any product that helps you lose weight without dieting is a crock my friends, but these sneakers promised that, and the company's forced to shell out $40 million as a result. can you guess the number one misleading product claim? pom wonderful claim that the juice helps you cheat death. cheat death, my friends, prevents alzheimer's, cancers, heart attack, stroke, and prevents aging. bring it on. i want some of that. eight ounces a day is 5u8 you need. you have to have your head examined if you believe that. that's what i say. coming up later in the show, when we come back, did president obama break the law? find out what the judge had to say, and, next, one the nation's most prominent republicans telling the party to stop being stupid. is he being fair? come back with us. ♪ gerri: is it time to rebr
.s. putting its own fiscal house in order to be a leader on the world stage. kerry, a long-time clean energy advocate says it is a $6 trillion market worth millions of american jobs and we need to get in the game. >> the solution of climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues. >> he was less committal about whether he would approve the keystone pipeline because it would cross the border between the u.s. and canada. kerry is expected to get a positive recommendation from the committee and if you will confirmation from the full senate next week. back with more bill press after the break. stay with us. alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'
shakers they are gone. >> slippery slope argument here that can be made. >> just like mention about energy drinks. i believe there needs to be regulation placed on those. as you are aware there was a 14-year-old girl that drank 2 and ended up having a heart attack. do i get why there is regulation on certain items. could the mayor go so far as to say everyone should do an hour of yoga a day and you should eat fish and not meat. >> i totally love the smoking ban i think that was a legitimate concern because of second hand smoke. if i want to consume something, i want to effect my own life, the fact that i drink 16 ounces of soda is not going to effect your life and your life kecia. that's what so outrageous. >> i think it's affecting the bits owner more than the consumer. the consumer stem has other options. they can go to other stores. it's not like it's everywhere. and like i said, if they want to get more than one, they can. it's not on every type of drink. >> isn't that just the point that you can buy two 10-ouncers and make it a 20-ouncer when 16 is banned? so in point in fact the ban
starting in eastern texas and oklahoma. this is going to head eastward. a lot of wind energy for this system. a lot of wind damage will be our main concern. we've got the cold, the snow, the record warmth and severe. it's more like late march than january. >> eric, thank you. wow, we were just talking about this gentleman. i've heard of him. the name is familiar. but i can't place a face. house committee paul ryan, how do we know him? he was a nobody that came on squawk and became vice president and now it's squawk who? i go on network now. he was on all the time. >> every day .now he won't -- >> he's coming on soon if you shut up. i love him. please, paul, i guess i'm just hurt. anyway, he says that the automatic spending cuts postponed as part of the fiscal cliff deal will go into effect as scheduled in march. a former vice presidential candidate says the sequester, which would cut $1.2 million in domestic and defense spending over the next two years will happen since democrats haven't offered alternatives to gop proposals. but ryan says no one is tuking about allowing an a
in an education, investing in energy is the way we are going to move the country forward. >> i want to let you know what's going on, we are about to see the president come onto the inaugural platform. that's what everybody is waiting for there. i'm sorry, go ahead. >> and i think this is going to be a real conversation that he's got to win with the american people that we can do something about our finances and still accomplish all those investments to take us to the next level of energy independence, of education, competing on the world platform in education. and doing the infrastructure that we are talking about when it comes to rail, when it comes to bridges, when it comes to the basics that help businesses across america. how are you going to do that? and how are you going to convince the republicans that you have to make these investments if you are going to move the country forward? we have two different philosophies on how to create jobs in this country. republicans think the government doesn't have a role. president obama, the democrats, the progressive community believe that you have
but no one can ignore drought and powerful storms. a path toward sustainable energy sources will be long and difficult. america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. we cannot see the technology that will power new jobs and industries. we must claim it promises. that is how we will claim our vitality peart our forests and waterways, are snowcapped peaks. that is how we will change our planet. that is what will end to our creed. we the people still believe that in during security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. our brave men and women in uniform, it tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skills and courage. our citizens, feared by the memory of those who have lost know too well the price that is paid for liberty. this will keep a vigilant against those that would do us harm. we are heirs to those who won the people. we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will defend our people and uphold our values through strengths of arms and rule of law. we will show courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peaceably not because
, renewable energy, reducing gun violence, and building an economy that last -- get this -- from the middle out. for all these reasons, and many more, it gives me great pleasure to second the nomination of congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz to serve a second term at the helm of the democratic national committee. [applause] >> thank you. the chair now recognizes a member of the dnc spanish cauc caucus, for another session and speech. by the way, i'm not trying to hog the stage. if you want to come up here, feel welcome. >> i am okay. thank you very much. good afternoon, everyone. i am very honored. i come from the great state that gave you the most marvelous president, barack obama. [applause] >> i am also proud to join my fellow democrats nominating congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz for the chair of democratic national committee. while my home is illinois, florida is very close and dear to my heart. my family is smart enough to move out there 20 years ago, so i consider you my congresswoman, too. i've always, i thought of debbie wasserman schultz as my second congressman. it is my
looks at corrections costs. helping america become more energy dependent. and paying for transportation structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. but can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed , and buffalo, and syracuse, and albany. i know women have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historical. i know it is difficult. if it
to work out their energy. the bulls looked to beat a febreze experiment. can a 30-day-old pluggable febreze make even this old container smell fresh? take a deep breath describe the room you're in. like a big open space. like i'm hanging the sheets on the line. it just smells really fresh, man. let's take your blindfold off. oh! [ both laugh ] super weird! oh, is it febreze? yeah. oh, how about that? febreze has anti-clogging technology that keeps it smelling fresh even after 30 days. febreze. breathe happy. hey, buddy? oh, hey, flo. you want to see something cool? snapshot, from progressive. my insurance company told me not to talk to people like you. you always do what they tell you? no... try it, and see what your good driving can save you. you don't even have to switch. unless you're scared. i'm not scared, it's... you know we can still see you. no, you can't. pretty sure we can... try snapshot today -- no pressure. miss, this seat's available. (sighs) this is too good to be true. hi. john stamos. enchantÉ this is too good to be tr
the president does not spend a lot of time, effort, or energy on. >> do you agree with that. >> if you look at the deal with congress, they tried every other relationship, the obama, the reed-mcconnell relationship but it was the biden relationship that set it off. he know he how to run a meeting. he runs through them. that's how you run a meeting. he know he how to do that. >> recently the president at a press conference had to say i'm a friendly guy, i'm a people guy, but joe biden really is that. >> joe biden is. and joe biden's excesses of being a people person and gregarious and enormously approachable, have been very important to this administration and to what david pointed out what happened, particularly in the last couple of months. briefly, we always here this is the most important vice president in the history of the world. how does he rank as vice presidents go? >> he actually just may be -- this may be one of the rare occasions where the superlative applies. we heard it about dick cheney in a different way. cheney, you had a sense -- cheney was in many ways provided the intelle
other sub budgets and a permanent energy. domestically, we have a much higher unemployment rate in 1968. we have more poverty absolutely and relatively and 1968. we certainly have more home foreclosures and more consumer debt. of course, 30 million workers are making today less than the workers made in 1968 adjusted for inflation. that is why we're launching this national drive to overpower congress and split the republicans in congress, organized and what the democrats, so tens of billions of dollars are poured into the community, into the long deserved pockets of these people, many of whom have children and they don't have health insurance or paid sick leave or big vacations. but they deserve $10.50 minimum wage, which is what it would be in 1968. no big deal. >> explain how that would work, how does an increase in the minimum wage actually work? >> 1, congress can pass it for all of the states. there is no competition between the states that way in terms of wage levels, no competition between businesses, etc. everyone would have to pay the same minimum wage. the other way is what has
democrats will go along. the epa and some other regulations are pretty hostile to small business, the energy production. and other are democrats or not really on board. alternative energy agenda that the obama administration is pursuing as well. and on health care, there are particular parts of obamacare that congress may be able to slow down or stop. the piece is mostly a report on what the administration is doing, but it gives guidance to congress. one thing republicans in congress needs to think about is what they can accomplish in by sized chunks. there will not change health care in a conservative direction in the next four years or reform entitlements. can they accomplished a few good things that also point the way towards bigger things later? i thing maybe they can. host: our guest is bill kristol. our next call is from frederick, maryland, peter is on the republican line. thanks for waiting. caller: how are things? host: fine. sounds like you're listening to us on c-span radio. caller: yes, sir. but itod to listen to, plays havoc on my blood pressure. republicans have been losing for
smiles, grins, lots of big energy among the folks who are here. some have come from all over the country and all over the world. we talked to people from as far away as poland here this morning. i can tell you capitalism is alive and well down here on the street. they are selling barack obama everything. we saw scarves, hats, buttons, pins. i will say some of the vendors told us because the crowds are smaller than they were four years ago, they said business is off a little bit from what they had expected because they sold so much merchandise four years ago. but they are very entrepreneurial here on the streets of washington, d.c., and they're moving a lot of goods today as well, tyler. >> all right. let's listen once again. thank you very much. as the brooklyn tabernacle choir concludes "the battle hymn of the republic." the musical selections will take a turn towards more popular performers in our next hour. kelly clarkson, who is known for her sort of anthemic songs and beyonce. >> before that we have james taylor. >> and james taylor "america the beautiful." >> someone i recognize, s
of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it! >> all right. so, for david maraniss, for some inside the echo chamber, there might have been some concern that there wasn't enough reaching out by the president to republicans on spending, on fiscal issues. but isn't this speech, the second inaugural, more to lay down markers for even generations to come, and then we have the state of the union, where perhaps he can address some of the short, and i mean, in the grand scheme of things, the short-term issues that our country faces. >> i think that's true. and i also think that this speech was ideological, but he's a pragmatic president. and so i think that not everything that he said in the speech -- you know, he said that it's going to be imperfect. the solutions will be imperfect. he's not going to try to please every constituency. if he just took climate change, for instance, and energy, i wouldn't doubt that he'll approve the keystone
legislation post-columbine did not pass. so the notion that everybody should rely on quote-unquote the energy and force of newtown i would caution not to do that. it's clearly galvanized the country to have an honest conversation and look internally and have a serious conversation, but brady bill and the assault weapon ban were done without, quote-unquote, a columbine or what happened in virginia, any of those incidents. i do believe just in the last four years or i would say the last eight years of politics this, what happened there has made all of us have a discussion that has been sitting on the sidelines or the periphery of politics to be focused and this, obviously, tomorrow morning the president's going to introduce his legislation or his package and decide what legislatively he's going to do, what he's going to do by executive order. but we are at a tipping point to have a discussion that's been postponed, delayed or for whatever reason hasn't happened. but my small kind of flashing yellow light of caution is when you think of the last time we had success which goes back to '93 and '94
who started a nutrition and energy bar company, despite california's tough tax climate, her company has grown over 400% in last 4 year, joining us now liz ann fal falseeto, these bari would like to think, i could drop a lot of weight real quick, if i think thin. >> you know, think thin is born off of premise of weight wellness, that is about deliciously natural nutrition that empowers you. lou: your business is booming. >> it is. lou: despite in california. terrible tax climate. terrible regulation climate. what is your secret for success? >> you know, everybody knows that taxes in california are high. but i can tell you, it's a great place to run a business for us. it is the health and wellness mecca of the world. and the clientele, that you can get. and team you can build is fantastic. but i contribute our growth to the fact that we're unique. we're unique in the marketplace because we're the only bar that has we'reo gram zugo, -- zero gram zug
energy. the things we build share one belief. that the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. >> alisyn: 44 minutes past the hour. time for quick headlines. social security could fall short in just three years. it's promised trillions of dollars more in benefits than the country can pay. in its worse shape. the disability trust fund could run out as as early as the year 2016. can you put the rulers away. subway now vowing to never serve a sand wimp that is less than 12 inches long ever again. the promise coming after australian man posted this photo of his subcoming up an inch short. it sparked worldwide outrage as can you hear from clayton and launched some lawsuits. go over to tucker. >> thanks, ali. if one bill is passed could leave smokers fuming it force smokers to have a doctor's prescription to buy cigarettes. is this a good idea? young joining us now is fair and balanced debate. smokers on the rise than any state. law photographer and founder on action in smoking and health antismoking group. thanks very much to both of you. profes
developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> we are following developing news. one person is dead after following the crash in oakland. >> i'm claudine wong. >> i'm mike mibach. it began with a traffic stop and ended in a deadly car collision in oakland. ktvu's alex savage is live at the scene where he just talked to witnesses to that crash. alex, what did they have to say? >> reporter: well neighbors around here describe this as a loud crash that woke up a lot of people. we do know that a 19-year-old man, a passenger in this stolen suv was killed in this crash. the suv was being chased by the chp officers this morning. still an active crime scene. taking measurements right now. they had eight people inside of it when the driver lost control on this curve and then hit a tree. we'll show you what this accident scene looked like this morning at the neighborhood
limits to 55. the department of energy has concluded the average vehicle fuel efficiency improves about 22% when the speeds dropped from 75 to 55 and everybody usually draws about 75, so right there painlessly and without costing anybody any money. melissa: are you advocating some businesses shut down, for example calls come in like utah, the other manufacturing base in the area, it is controversial because it employs about 120,000 people in the area, would you like them to shut down, are you part of that group? >> no. we are not advocating anybody lose their job. if our state government actually implanted a recommendation, it would probably add employment to the state, not subtracted. one of the consequences of the air pollution it has is really economic repercussions when it is broadcast throughout the world salt lake city has a worse air pollution in the country, that has a profound economic liability to it. it is a bad message to send to other states and the rest of the world. melissa: you are right about that. now you are getting so much attention, negative for the reason you just
clarity not only in the tax code but across the business landscape to allow, for instance, energy jobs to continue to grow. we have a natural gas export revolution happening in the country. where do republicans who are talking about that -- for that matter, i was in detroit over the last few days, where is the urban growth message from democrats and republicans alike? i hear the spending cuts and tax reform, and i agree with all of that, but there's a vast majority of the country that's experiencing something very, very different in job creation and growth seem to be lacking from the party, your party -- >> both parties. >> which for years we've talked about it and has laid out a clear agenda for. >> kelly o'donnell, the disconnect, in my opinion, from the president's inaugural address and where we are as a country, not just on debt, but on job creation, on falling average income, he focused on some issues that are very important to some constituencies. and i certainly understand that. but certainly doesn't speak to middle america who still is very concerned economically about where we
rain yesterday in arizona and most of that energy now, pulling out here across parts of the central plains and there you see that pink, that's where we're concerned at least to start right now, about icing. warmer air moving over the cold air at the surface and the rain hits the ground that's frozen and it freezes on contact. and roads across areas of iowa and maybe around the st. louis area where more generally towards illinois and that's going to be a zone for some icing and eventually later on today, in towards chicago. to the far north of that, places like minnesota, northern minnesota and much of wisconsin we'll be talking about snow. but this storm moving in. the good news, behind this, things are going to warm up quite a bit and big changes. look at today's high. better than yesterday. above freezing for the first time for lot of people in about a week and that's a nice break. tomorrow, you start to see the temps climb and towards the northeast. by tuesday. 60 degrees in washington d.c. and behind it, the next batch of colder air it's not as cold as the last one, welcome news
] is a prettyt powerful idea. i am emily. [applause] >> i am claire mccaskill. [applause] the energy in this room is amazing. i am taking it with me. i will draw upon it many times over the next six years when there are tough votes ahead. many people heard of todd akin before i was a senator or a statewide official. i was the daughter of the first woman ever elected to the council in the town i grew up in. [applause] i knew what it took. it was not a mystery. it was willing to take risks and hard work. before anyone had heard of todd akin, she said she could not win. the terrain is too tough in a red a state like missouri. i said i have a plan. they did not listen. many did not return my calls. then there was emily's list. they listened. they returned my calls. stephanie and her team of hundreds and thousands of women across the country said we support what you are doing. we understand your plan. they got it. if this helps the extreme type a and when the republican primary that could be a gift for every candidates in the country by exposing his extreme views to the united states of america. it wo
kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪
energy. read more about these mysterious forces and what scientists hope to find on our science page. and think you've received bad advice about social security? our benefits guru gets to the bottom of that issue in today's "ask larry" column on our business page. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on tuesday, we'll return to the immigration debate with a look at the president's plans for reform. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. thank you, and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> macarthur foundation. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh
testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel). the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy, increases testosterone when used daily. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or signs in a woman, which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are or may become pregnant or are breastfeeding, should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count, swelling of ankles, feet, or body, enlarged or painful breasts, problems b
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